12 Most Compelling Reasons to Homeschool Your Children

12 Most Compelling Reasons to Homeschool Your Children

I’ve been a public school educator and administrator for more than a decade, so you may be surprised that when parents ask for my advice about education, I often suggest they allow their children to leave school. Education reform is happening today, but it’s slow and often ineffective. Parents need to do what is in the best interest of their children, right now.

For some this means working hard with a school to adapt to meet a child’s needs. But many schools are rigid and don’t believe students are entitled to a customized learning experience. For these parents the best option is often to leave school behind and empower children with the freedom to learn what they want in the way that is best for them.

Here are the twelve most compelling reasons for leaving school behind if your child is not finding success and happiness there.

1. Learning is customized not standardized

•  In school learning is standardized to what someone else says is best.
•  At home learning is customized to what the child and parent feel is best.

2. Associate with those you enjoy rather than those who share your birth year

•  In school students are grouped by date of manufacture.
•  At home children can choose to be with those whose company they enjoy.

3. Freedom to learn with their tools

•  In school students are often banned from using they tools they love to learn with — such as a cell phone.
•  At home children can learn with the tools they choose. For many children technology open doors that schools slam shut.

4. Socialize with those who share your passions not just your zip code

•  In school students have little opportunity to socialize and even when they do it is generally confined to those with whom they’ve been grouped with by year and geography.
•  At home children have the opportunity to socialize and make global connections with others of any age who share their talents, passions, and interests.

5. Real life measures are better than bubble tests

•  In school we measure students success with bubble tests and response to prompts.
•  At home we measure success by what children accomplish that matters to them. Some teens like Leah Miller have developed their own personal success plan (see hers here). She sets her goals and then assesses her success in meeting them.

6. Don’t just read about doing stuff. Do stuff!

•  In school students are forced to sit at desks all day reading and answering questions about stuff other people do.
•  At home children don’t need to spend their time reading and writing about what other people do. They can go do stuff.

7. Travel when you want

•  In school they tell you when to go on vacation and families hop off to crowded destinations together.
•  At home families can decide when travelling works best for them and also get better rates.

8. You are more than a number

•  In school the only things students have to show for their work are numbers and graphs known as report cards, transcripts, or data reports.
•  At home children often put together meaningful portfolios that can be reflected upon and powerfully capture and celebrate learning. This can be done at school, but it rarely happens as little time is left for assessment and reflection after testing and test prep.

9. Do work you value

•  In school students do work someone else wants for someone else’s purpose.
•  At home children can engage in meaningful work for reasons they determine are important.

10. Independence is valued over dependence

•  In school students are dependent on others to tell them what to do and when. They spend their time as compliant workers and are discouraged from questioning authority.
•  At home children are encouraged to explore, discover, and develop their own passions and talents and given the freedom to work deeply in these areas. They know how to learn independently because they are interested, not because they are told to do something.

11. You don’t have to waste learning time with standardized tests

•  In school students and their teachers are spending a large percentage of their time preparing for tests and testing even though test have little to no role in real life. My last test was more than a decade ago. How about you?
•  At home children have the freedom to enjoy learning without the burden or stress of testing. Although many children and parents have been trained to believe testing is a necessary evil in school kids who have the freedom to learn without testing are doing just fine and exploring their passions as grown unschooler Kate Fridkis explains in her article that reveals how we can learn successfully without testing.

12. No more meaningless worksheets and reports

•  In school students often complain they are forced to do meaningless worksheets and reports that have no real purpose or audience. In fact these worksheets and reports often actually suck the joy out of learning. Think about it. When was the last time you read a great book and thought, “Wow! I want to write a report or fill in a worksheet.”
•  At home children can do work that matters and has meaning. If they read a book they love they can hop online and discuss it with other people who’ve read it or publish a review for Amazon. If they want to learn something they have an unfiltered world of resources (inaccessible in many schools) at their fingertips to do so.

Parents of Generation Z have woken up and realized that the industrial model school’s of today are preparing their children for a world that no longer exists. They know that those who receive outdated, classroom-based instruction will end up with the rest of the young people Occupying Wall Street and beyond.

However, there is another option! Home educating families are onto something. The children of these families will grow up as adults who know how to take ownership of their learning and their lives. They will be empowered with the ability to attain satisfaction and success in life and career.

What are your thoughts on the current public education system? Does homeschooling sound appealing to you?

Like this post? You might also enjoy 12 Most Loving Ways to Spark Creativity in Your Child.

If you liked this article, please give it a thumbs up  in Stumbleupon. Thanks!

Featured image courtesy of  Éktor via Creative Commons.

Lisa Nielsen

Lisa Nielsen has spent more than a decade working in various capacities in the public school system as an administrator and teacher to support learning in real and innovative ways that will prepare students for success. In addition to her award winning blog TheInnovativeEducator, Ms. Nielsen’s writing is featured in places such as Huffington Post, Tech & Learning, MindShift, Leading & Learning. She is the author of the book Teaching Generation Text TeachingGenerationText.com, and has published. The Teenager’s Guide to Opting Out of School For Success, The Working Home Educator’s Guide to Success, and Fix The School, Not The Child.

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280 comments
RichardBale
RichardBale

CAN ANYONE ANSWER THIS QUESTION? WHY TEACH?

smarie
smarie

Not saying that home schooling is not effective, but these 12 "compelling" reasons are not compelling at all! Just to point out a few, #3 - some would argue that it is the use of tech such as cell phones that leads to more and more children less interested in reading. #4 - a little confused as to how children are able to socialize more and make global connections from home. #5 - the use of "bubble tests" are essential for the preparation of college, graduate education or beyond (ie. SAT, GRE, MCAT, USMLE are all examples of standardized "bubble tests"). #6 - "At home children don't need to spend their time reading and writing about what other people do. They can do stuff.", now I'm sorry, but this just sounds like a very uneducated comment. We read and write about what other people before us have done in order to learn from other's mistakes before jumping into an activity. No sense in reinventing the wheel. You read and write first, and then you do! #9 - "Do work you value". Children need to learn how to do the work given and take on responsibilities. It is what is eventually needed to maintain a job...unless you KNOW 100% you are raising an entrepreneur, but even then, to get through college, you go by the accredited college's curriculum, NOT one that YOU feel is important. #11 - As mentioned before college education and beyond use standardized testing. Your physicians and lawyers credibility is measured

SS in the
SS in the

couple more.  1) the "adults know best and the kids are there to be trained" model is inherently violent.  2) for some kids, being part of a group is so difficult that there is little energy left over for learning 3) where we live, it was hard to be the only non Christian kids had ever met.  someone we know got  told they were going to hell on a daily basis, even by the concerned teachers. 4) someone who is asynchronous in development is not always well served

KellyBeaulieuGraves
KellyBeaulieuGraves

I just wanted to say my son goes to school but I like some of the homeschooling ideas but when I read some of the comments about school now a days....give me a break, my sons school is amazing the teacher's are great and caring, no knives no guns but I feel you do have to stay in touch with their teachers. My son has made many friends and yes they are around the neighborhood but now we know more kids to play with. I think if people want to homeschool go for it and for the rest of us we send our kids to school for a lot of different reasons and that's why we are a FREE country..

RichardBale
RichardBale

I could give you some more reasons too. Instead of generisism of Darwinism of perhaps, probably, supposedly or maybe millions of years ago, man came from monkeys when monkeys grow fur and an extra knuckle to walk on the back of their hands. Man grows hair which is much different than fur and man can think of what is right and wrong and reason within himself as a monkey cannot put to words and will do nothing more than shinnannigans and pull tricks and pranks on each other and eat each other and have no morals about them. By the way, monkey's brains are much smaller than the human brain.

    By the way, some children with a wrong preconceived ideas of immorality and unGodly words, actions, and intentions seems to go against the norm of civility that certainly do not have the teachings of a church whatsoever, with more of the TV indiscretionary viewing that is not cared about or is not supervised at home of which gets acted out and repeated by those who like to see their neighbors be hurt by and make a career out of anything violent and unedifying and made to feel  very conscienciously unholy and uncomfortable to the other person with more proper bringing up opposite of being dragged up from the jungle!!!

Rev. Richard M. Bale



Tejohn
Tejohn

I disagree about current schools being "Industrial". Dewey started that. The rest of the article is right on target.

cellarcoat
cellarcoat

Great article!  As an Educational Psychologist, I can tell you that studies show the level of education or resources available from the parent has no correlation to how well the home-schooled student does.   My husband and his 3 brothers were home-schooled by their mother who did not have a college degree.  My husband received his PhD from Duke, is now a university professor, and is qualified to guide students through the PhD process.  One of his brothers received a PhD from Vanderbilt and is a space physicist. Another brother is an optical engineer, and another is in computers.  What studies do show is that student to teacher ratio is a big factor in the success of the student.   

satchmo
satchmo

Few parents have time, experience, and resources to be teachers for their children.

Some parents are illiterate themselves, and it would be challenging for them to be effective teachers for their children.

PMeadors
PMeadors

Home schooling is fine for the dedicated parent who has had experiance in the educational relm. It is a full time job for them and not taken lightly. As an  technical educator in the Community College system I have had experiance with young people who were home schooled. They ranged from OMG how did you pass to WOW you could teach this class. The trouble that I see is parents who do not know the material to begin with and or, as one young man I had, just watched tapes that his parents purchased.

I understand that home schooled students do have to take tests for grade progression. Home schooling has some real advantages as well as some disadvantages. If it is done properly, can be good for all concerned but I do believe that the parents should take some college classes to learn teaching methods and how we learn.I spent 7 years going to school to be a teacher and to say that someone who, only has a high school education, has little to no college, or a college degree(s) in something other than education can teach children is demeaning to those who are teachers.

Yes I know that there are good and bad teachers and the educational system is not perfect but I feel that we need to change the system and not give parents permission to just say "I don't like the school system" so I'll home school.

JoannaWert
JoannaWert

If you live in PA and homeschool, your kids need to be tested in 3rd, 5th, and 8th grades.  Also, you have to turn in a portfolio every year, which may or may not include quizzes and tests.  My kids have all fulfilled requirements for diploma programs, so I have tested once they were in high school in order to assign grades.

Mollie
Mollie

What about Montessori schools?  Every single one of these things happens in Montessori schools every day, except, I suppose, for the travel when you want to.  I pray every day that Montessori schools become the standard.  Because Montessori schools exist, I don't have to homeschool my children.  I just wish that they were accessible to everyone--there are not enough to go around.  Doing what I can to get more of them out there. 

Not all schools are made alike.  Montessori schools are the exception--and exceptional.

anne lesley
anne lesley

Hold on there- public school kids will end up "Occupying Wall Street"? The people I know who were involved in Occupy were college professors, writers, and activists passionately with the problem of social injustice. It was visited by and written about some of the most interesting philosophers of our day, like Judith Butler. I think your article points to the problem that public school kids likely WONT end up occupying Wall Street, but rather, will occupy Wall Street's offices, where ranking, false value, and human on human competition is the curriculum of the day.        

Sydney
Sydney

Good luck getting in the real world if you barley have any social experience. I strongly disagree with all of these facts

smarie
smarie

...by their performance on standardized testing. Standardized testing is not a form of learning, it is a form of measuring level of education and therefore a necessary assessment of qualification. Therefore, it is hardly a waste of time. I can go on and on about each one of these reasons. As mentioned, I am not saying home schooling is not effective, but this article is pretty ineffective in convincing me why I should home school my child.

LaurenKempel
LaurenKempel

@RichardBale We didn't evolve from monkeys. You need to open book written by someone qualified to educate you. Start with astrophysicists and move on to (millions of years later) Darwin's Theories (try actually reading the books).

Tejohn
Tejohn

@satchmo In public school the resources are consumed by administration, special buildings and transportation. Please observe the hundreds of millions of dollars spent on buses. Kids get passed up to the next grade even when they can't read. Both parents may have to work and then the children are trapped where I went to school but I've spent the next 53 years getting a real education.

LaryssaLynnBusbyKrauss
LaryssaLynnBusbyKrauss

@satchmo Not so!  In my early years of homeschooling our family traveled with my husband on his job...all over the country.  On one of our work travels we ended up in Colorado.  I quickly located a local homeschool group to join.  During the first meeting, a planning session for the year where each parent presented ideas for field trips and educational opportunities for the upcoming year, I met a woman who could barely read!  I remember thinking, 'Oh, my goodness...her poor children!  I bet they are so far behind."  However, they were NOT!  Their reading, writing, & comprehension skills were right on target.  I remember thinking, "How in the world can this be so when their mother can barely read?"  That was my first experience with the advantages of homeschooling!  The love & care of a parent, the one on one time spent with the child, & the strong desire & determination of the parent to see the child succeed far outweigh any deficiencies the parent may have.  They will find a way to make sure their children get what they need!  I also met a woman who was blind, yet her kids were amazing!    Your logic is flawed; it seems based on the fact that a parent's knowledge is limited to what they already know upon beginning homeschooling.  I've learned some things right alongside my children.  Nothing beats a mother's love for her kids, or her desire for them to succeed.  Time?  How about the kids being in public school for 8 hours, yet bringing home HOURS worth of homework?  Homeschoolers 'get er done'. lol  Experience?  A college degree does not a teacher make, but the parent has known the child since birth & taught them everything thus far.  Resources?  There is nothing more resourceful than a homeschooling parent. ;-)  Research has disproven your 'theory'.  The level of education of the parent or socio-economic background does NOT make a difference in the outcome of the educational experience of the homeschooled child.  Check out HSLDA.org for more info on statistics.

delphina108
delphina108

@satchmo  Thats what I used to think until we did cyber school for two years and I started to realize I could learn right along with my children and when they were excited about what they were learning they just about did it on their own. It amazed me how much my kids retained just from reading a book together and discussing it.  The conventional school situation is teachers having to entertain to make learning fun while pushing high pressure standards that don't meet individual needs. Of course parents cant do that - but that is not what homeschool looks like.

Mama_to_six
Mama_to_six

@PMeadors Many unfortunately see home school as an attack on teachers. It is far from it . I t is an embracing as our role as parents and teachers. Those that ,for what ever reason, choose the  public school are there for your help. It does NOT make those of us who teach at home, with whatever methods we choose, inept. 

An interesting book on the school system is "Pillars of the Republic".

I want my children to be self learners and not always rely on others to teach what they can learn on their own. I will not give you the chance to use my kids to 'change the system' when I can facilitate a thinking students needs. My kids nor yours stop being my respondsiblity at age 5 for 8 hours a day.

While I am a college grad. I know many smart and capable parents with less education that do a great job of HS. I also know that in PS there are many teachers that are schooled in one subject but that teach another. I beleive it is the enthusiasm for learning that is the key and the rest can be managed.  Who taught Franklin to invent? He was allowed to think and grow and learn, not stuffed into a box. 

I see my kids as more open to learning from many sources not just a school and a teacher.


smarie
smarie

So far this is the only sensible comment I've read!

delphina108
delphina108

@PMeadors Not give parents 'permission'??  we are the parents, we should be the ones giving the schools permission and frankly, the schools fail more kids than parents who homeschool do It is an insult to parents to say we could not teach our own kids. You go to school to teach a classroom full of kids you do not know with multiple levels of learning with all the discipline problems and developmental issues that there may be. My kids were gifted and bored but no matter how much I worked with the teachers, there was nothing they could do but assign more boring, easy work.  I don't blame the teachers, they are stuck in the system, but until you get the system fixed, you do not have my permission to destroy my childrens' love of learning. My kids do not belong to the teachers or the government, they are mine and I know whats best for them.

Daph
Daph

@PMeadors Are you implying that non one is capable of learning anything unless they're on a college campus? 

"I'm sorry, you can't learn how to teach someone to change their oil. You didn't learn that in school." "Sorry, ma'am, you can't teach that four-year-old their Alphabet because you didn't learn how to teach them in school." 


Tracey
Tracey

@PMeadors @PMeadors While what you are saying sounds reasonable, study after study shows that the parents' education level makes no difference in outcomes, but dedication does. Parents do not simply pull information out of our heads anymore than teachers do: there are curricula written expressly for the purpose of teaching one student (rather than a classroom full, where classroom control is an issue). And there are also curricula that help the parent teach several levels of students the same subject on different levels. And there are online classes, live classes, tutors etc. for those who believe they can't teach that subject themselves.


One of the prime factors in teaching a student, a particular student, is to know that student's strengths, weaknesses, and learning style(s). Homeschooling mentors out there encourage parents to figure out their kids' individual learning styles early on. It's something that the homeschooling community is well aware of. It is not meant as a slam on teachers: you just have a different job and focus, to teach a classroomful of strangers' kids to a basic level. We parents have a different job: to raise the people who will one day be choosing, and possibly funding, our nursing homes. :-)

athomemommy
athomemommy

@PMeadors But are there not the same feelings of children (students) coming out of the public system as well; the "OMG how did you pass to WOW you could teach this class" and everything in between those markers?

Parents are not given mandatory parenting classes to raise a child from birth to 5yo, until we are mandated to hand them over to the State or Province. How is it that we suddenly become incapable? Would not just naturally grow and develop along with our children? You are a specialist in the field of public education, I am a specialist in the life and learning of my child. You see education as a direction, destination; we see it as a vehicle to enhance life.

LJM
LJM

@Mollie There should definitely be Montessori style schools available to any family who wants to use one.  But there shouldn't be any standard at all, really, because there's no such thing as a "standard" student.  Some kids do well in the present paradigm and others do well with absolutely no structure whatsoever.  We should allow individual kids to learn in the ways that suit them best.

GlendaP
GlendaP

When my daughter was very young I investigated Montessori for her.  I was invited to an observation session and I sat and watched several children.  I saw one child pick up a box of activity cards and start to play with them.  I saw a teacher go to this child and tell her that she was not allowed to use these cards yet as she was not ready for them.  I sat there and decided that my daughter would only be caused frustration if she was not allowed to explore freely, in a school system which I thought prided itself on self directed learning.  SO yes, I could not get out the door fast enough!

Don
Don

@anne lesley - OWS turned out to be a microcosm of socialism. Their utopian ideals of "equality" was their idea of a just society. They created "committees" ( just like in a communist society ), they had those committees assign work and tasks ( just like in a communist society ), then they started collecting money on a website ( $500,000 ) at one point and "paying" workers based on an "equal" pay scheme. Then the infighting began since some people worked harder than others but were given the same pay. Socialism failed again. Why? Because the OWS folks weren't not educated in history, economics and work.

OWS was nothing but people who - due to their lack of understanding of basic economics - were using modern technology ( all developed in the markets ) to protest markets. They wanted the government to take money others earned and redistribute it to those that didn't. They believed that a "living wage" and a job are their right meaning they believe they have a right to other people's wealth.

Home schooling can teach kids those basic principles of economics, the devastating affects of government on the economy ( such as we're still experiencing today ) and how to be innovators, inventers and hard workers in the markets ( a work ethic ) and never feel the need to lobby government for other people's money.

MikeBiegner
MikeBiegner

@anne lesley could not agree more, Anne.  I am a big fan of self directed learning, which Home Schooling is a subset of. But if all our kids ended up Occupying Wall Street, i would call that a successful pedagogy.  :-)

awritermom
awritermom

@Sydney Homeschoolers live and learn in the "real world," something children in school do not do since they are stuck in a room with a group of people all their own age doing what one older person tells them to do...not a situation usually found in the real world.

Homeschoolers are part of the real world and interact with it every day, socializing with people of all ages and backgrounds out in the real world, and they have the time to participate in many more activities like sports, art, music, youth groups, Scouts, and the like since everything learned in a week of public school can be learned at home in 1-4 hours.  (That leaves a lot more time for socializing and interacting with thew real world, something kids in school miss out on.)

Clothmomma
Clothmomma

@Sydney It is apparent you have interacted with few homeschooled children (or you do and don't realize they were homeschooled). Children do not sit at home all day in locked confines when they are educated at home. In fact, they are usually out in society MORE than their peers. I have yet to meet a child who was homeschooled that was not socially competent. You need some education on what happens in home education so you can speak from an educated standpoint instead of just repeating what you hear. My children are educated at home and are social butterflies. Between dance, art class, co-op, play dates, field trips and church, my child has no problem with socialization. However, my children have far superior adult interaction skills than their peers, so not only are my children social, they are more social than most. 

Eyerishangel
Eyerishangel

@Sydney Homeschooled kids are VERY socialized. They socialize with ALL ages of their community. My daughter who is 12 is dying to become an entrepreneur and is currently exploring what talents she wants to take in that direction. She wouldn't have that luxury of freedom if she were stuck in a classroom learning how to take tests six hours a day. I'm self employed and, quite honestly, I would not have it any other way. This IS our real world and we support ourselves. We do not answer to anyone but ourselves. My daughter is a very confident and outgoing young lady who can articulate her needs to anyone at any age. She's going to have a very successful career in anything she chooses because, unlike kids her age who are in the public school system, is being groomed to think like a business person. Rest assured my daughter will be well on her way to self employment by the time her peers graduate from high school. ;)

The Life of O Reilly
The Life of O Reilly

@Sydney @Sydney, Do you actually believe we keep our children isolated in our homes and never socialized with anyone?  That's quite an extreme assumption.  While I cannot speak for all homeschoolers, many of our children have daily interactions with adults and children of different ages.  They are active in extra curricular activities with similar age groups, which is far more beneficial that being only with children born the same year.  Frankly, the social behavior that develops in the school systems, both public and private, is horrid in my experience.  There is not adequate supervision and guidance with the student/staff ratio, and bullying has become out of control. My child doesn't need that sort of social experience.

Kat
Kat

@Sydney Sydney, I suggest you homeschool to learn how to spell and use punctuation because clearly you missed that in public school! 

PamelaBradleyWeir
PamelaBradleyWeir

@Sydney I home educated 5 children.  The last two spent NO time in the public education system.  My youngest son started his own web design business at age 14.  He taught himself many computer languages, and is a socially competent adult. That was ten years ago.  He is a successful entrepreneur, totally self-taught, still loves to learn and is a great mentor.  He is still webmaster for the company who hired him at age 14 and, in fact, at one point they went to a computer program graduate and attempted to hire them to replace him.   When they told the graduate what he needed to be able to do (which my son was currently doing), he paled and told them he did not know how to do those things.  They came back to my son, raised his pay and now both are still in that happy relationship.  He obviously has way more social experience than those who spend all their waking hours with only age-mates.


RichardBale
RichardBale

@LaurenKempel @RichardBale I know we didn't evolve. I have read and still do read God's Word KJB and I have books from ICR-Institute of Creation Research and Bible Commentaries. I have more books than you can shake a stick at!!! LOL


democratic educator
democratic educator

@Daph @PMeadors I doubt that was the intent. Changing the oil is like reading to your child until they are 12. It is just good parenting that SUPPORTS their education. (AND YES! Read TO your children well beyond the time they can read for themselves!)  You certainly would not trust the entire maintenance of your vehicle to an untrained worker, I hope!

democratic educator
democratic educator

@Tracey @PMeadors I know several home schooling families who make up their own curriculum, teach from the textbooks and workbooks, and print out reproducibles for their children to complete.  Yes, they have dynamic field trips, but the day-to-day instructional methods are more than 30 years outdated. 

 Good teachers do not teach to a basic level. Good teachers in the classroom know each child's strengths, weaknesses, and learning styles. My son's high school math teacher knew he took math for the challenge, but that he was more interested in the preforming arts. She taught 5 classes of 20 students each day and was still able and available to support his learning.

You are correct, a parent's job is to raise the child. I think they should support their education with a variety of field trips and home activities to extend what they learn at school.

 

Good parents are not strangers to the teachers. They visit school several times a year to help and observe in the classroom, and chaperone field trips. All my children's teachers knew my husband and I. Even in middle and high school. I was as sad  when my son graduated this year because we have been at the high school for 10 years. The school is part of our community and the educators inside are valued and respected.

democratic educator
democratic educator

@The Life of O Reilly There is a huge different between socialization and social learning. Additionally, while I do not support bullying, I do believe we cannot isolate our children forever and they need the interpersonal skills and decision-making ability to work with all types of people and personalities. You cannot protect your child forever. In school, they learn how to build relationships (through classroom instruction and real experiences) with a wider variety of people than those you hand-select.

RichardBale
RichardBale

@ScrapCath @RichardBale @LaurenKempel You understood me wrong ScrapCath. I have socialized with homeschooled children and it wasn't them of whom I was referring.  I would rather you refer to your tv guide and see the listings for yourself. And for keeping an opened mind, mine is closed for satan's use; thank you very much ScrapCath.

ScrapCath
ScrapCath

@RichardBale @LaurenKempel  

Yep, we know your kind like to shake sticks and worse Richard. I suggest you open your mind and actually interact with homeschooled children. You will find them in your church community for sure. You just don't know it!

I am yet to meet an home schooled child who knows which tv shows you are talking about!

LJM
LJM

@democratic educator There are great schools out there and it's wonderful that you were lucky enough to be part of one.  But even the very best schools can't meet the needs of a good portion of the students, even those with great parents.  That's because kids learn in different ways and have different needs at different ages.  Homeschooling is just one option for families with kids who aren't happy at school.

Tracey
Tracey

@democratic educator @Tracey @PMeadors Most of the government schools I know use methods that are outdated, too. And then there are the many successful homeschoolers I know, with kids admitted to many different universities including very selective ones, who used a 2500+ year-old method called Classical Education. Oddly enough, it stresses real thinking skills, languages, math and the arts--not unlike "21st Century Education".  @democratic educator  is right that if you do choose government school for your kids, it is essential to be involved if the teacher will allow real involvement. Some don't want it and see it as interference--not *good* teachers, but some average ones.

awritermom
awritermom

@democratic educator  You make some good points.  "The interpersonal skills and decision-making ability to work with all types of people and personalities" is exactly what homeschooling gives students.  Rather than being stuck in a room full of people their own age, they are out interacting with people of all ages and backgrounds in the world.

Rather than "isolating our children forever" in school classrooms, I think we should let them out to learn in and from the world.  Rather than isolating children in an artificial environment, let's integrate them with their world and let them learn from it.

LJM
LJM

@democratic educator There is not one iota of evidence to support the notion that kids who are homeschooled have fewer social skills than kids who go to public school.

Public school is fantastic for kids who enjoy public school.   But we can't ignore the fact that there are millions of kids from a variety of backgrounds who simply do not enjoy public school and they deserve a learning environment in which they can thrive.

JessicaVanVleet
JessicaVanVleet

@democratic educator @Daph @The Life of O Reilly You are absolutely correct. Schools are not what they were 10-20 yrs ago. Now they bring knives or worse to school and the students are not disciplined at home. These are not conflicts I need my children learning to deal with during school. I had no issues in school, but my children are homeschooled because their experiences were horrid.

Clothmomma
Clothmomma

@democratic educator @The Life of O Reilly Homeschooling children have no less social learning experience than traditional school children in most cases. This is a presumption made by those with no experience in home education. I thought this before I started home educating my children. I went to public school and had always heard you "needed" that type of social interaction. I decided to bite the bullet and take my children's education into my own hands and to my surprise (yes surprise) I found how many socialization activities occur. There are infinite possibilities for the same social learning you receive in a public school setting. My children do attend a co-op weekly where they sit down just like public school children with their peers and learn. However, in addition to that they also experience a lot of people on a daily basis in real world settings. There are more homeschooled children than you would imagine that we interact with almost daily in a  variety of settings. From play dates, museum trips, zoo trips, library visits, dance class, church group, choir, co-op, and everyday interaction with people around us, my children are highly socialized and social learners. My children have the opportunity to interact with peers in age specific courses as well as adults frequently making for a socially well-rounded individual. 

Daph
Daph

@democratic educator @Daph @The Life of O Reilly  Wrong again. You are, once again, making assumptions. My children know nothing of my school experience. I was merely commenting on the insinuation that all children build positive relationships in school. That's not always true. Ten to twenty years (hardly), but let's go with that: Are you seriously telling me that most kids will not be bullied or experience peer pressure? Has something happened in the past ten to twenty years that has caused those things to vanish into the ether? 

democratic educator
democratic educator

@Daph @democratic educator @The Life of O Reilly You do realize that schools are not the same as they were 10 or twenty years ago, right? Character curriculum is frequently implemented because not all parents consciously teach their children values or positive behavior. Way to put your life experiences on your children. It is more than possible that their experience would be better than yours.

Daph
Daph

@democratic educator @The Life of O Reilly Bull hockey. I didn't learn any of that in school. I only learned that my only friends were books and that I wasn't good enough for anyone around me. I carried that into my adult life. You cannot tell me that that type of socialization is better. 

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