12 Most Compelling Reasons to Homeschool Your Children

12 Most Compelling Reasons to Homeschool Your Children

I’ve been a public school educator and administrator for more than a decade, so you may be surprised that when parents ask for my advice about education, I often suggest they allow their children to leave school. Education reform is happening today, but it’s slow and often ineffective. Parents need to do what is in the best interest of their children, right now.

For some this means working hard with a school to adapt to meet a child’s needs. But many schools are rigid and don’t believe students are entitled to a customized learning experience. For these parents the best option is often to leave school behind and empower children with the freedom to learn what they want in the way that is best for them.

Here are the twelve most compelling reasons for leaving school behind if your child is not finding success and happiness there.

1. Learning is customized not standardized

•  In school learning is standardized to what someone else says is best.
•  At home learning is customized to what the child and parent feel is best.

2. Associate with those you enjoy rather than those who share your birth year

•  In school students are grouped by date of manufacture.
•  At home children can choose to be with those whose company they enjoy.

3. Freedom to learn with their tools

•  In school students are often banned from using they tools they love to learn with — such as a cell phone.
•  At home children can learn with the tools they choose. For many children technology open doors that schools slam shut.

4. Socialize with those who share your passions not just your zip code

•  In school students have little opportunity to socialize and even when they do it is generally confined to those with whom they’ve been grouped with by year and geography.
•  At home children have the opportunity to socialize and make global connections with others of any age who share their talents, passions, and interests.

5. Real life measures are better than bubble tests

•  In school we measure students success with bubble tests and response to prompts.
•  At home we measure success by what children accomplish that matters to them. Some teens like Leah Miller have developed their own personal success plan (see hers here). She sets her goals and then assesses her success in meeting them.

6. Don’t just read about doing stuff. Do stuff!

•  In school students are forced to sit at desks all day reading and answering questions about stuff other people do.
•  At home children don’t need to spend their time reading and writing about what other people do. They can go do stuff.

7. Travel when you want

•  In school they tell you when to go on vacation and families hop off to crowded destinations together.
•  At home families can decide when travelling works best for them and also get better rates.

8. You are more than a number

•  In school the only things students have to show for their work are numbers and graphs known as report cards, transcripts, or data reports.
•  At home children often put together meaningful portfolios that can be reflected upon and powerfully capture and celebrate learning. This can be done at school, but it rarely happens as little time is left for assessment and reflection after testing and test prep.

9. Do work you value

•  In school students do work someone else wants for someone else’s purpose.
•  At home children can engage in meaningful work for reasons they determine are important.

10. Independence is valued over dependence

•  In school students are dependent on others to tell them what to do and when. They spend their time as compliant workers and are discouraged from questioning authority.
•  At home children are encouraged to explore, discover, and develop their own passions and talents and given the freedom to work deeply in these areas. They know how to learn independently because they are interested, not because they are told to do something.

11. You don’t have to waste learning time with standardized tests

•  In school students and their teachers are spending a large percentage of their time preparing for tests and testing even though test have little to no role in real life. My last test was more than a decade ago. How about you?
•  At home children have the freedom to enjoy learning without the burden or stress of testing. Although many children and parents have been trained to believe testing is a necessary evil in school kids who have the freedom to learn without testing are doing just fine and exploring their passions as grown unschooler Kate Fridkis explains in her article that reveals how we can learn successfully without testing.

12. No more meaningless worksheets and reports

•  In school students often complain they are forced to do meaningless worksheets and reports that have no real purpose or audience. In fact these worksheets and reports often actually suck the joy out of learning. Think about it. When was the last time you read a great book and thought, “Wow! I want to write a report or fill in a worksheet.”
•  At home children can do work that matters and has meaning. If they read a book they love they can hop online and discuss it with other people who’ve read it or publish a review for Amazon. If they want to learn something they have an unfiltered world of resources (inaccessible in many schools) at their fingertips to do so.

Parents of Generation Z have woken up and realized that the industrial model school’s of today are preparing their children for a world that no longer exists. They know that those who receive outdated, classroom-based instruction will end up with the rest of the young people Occupying Wall Street and beyond.

However, there is another option! Home educating families are onto something. The children of these families will grow up as adults who know how to take ownership of their learning and their lives. They will be empowered with the ability to attain satisfaction and success in life and career.

What are your thoughts on the current public education system? Does homeschooling sound appealing to you?

Like this post? You might also enjoy 12 Most Loving Ways to Spark Creativity in Your Child.

If you liked this article, please give it a thumbs up  in Stumbleupon. Thanks!

Featured image courtesy of  Éktor via Creative Commons.

Lisa Nielsen

Lisa Nielsen has spent more than a decade working in various capacities in the public school system as an administrator and teacher to support learning in real and innovative ways that will prepare students for success. In addition to her award winning blog TheInnovativeEducator, Ms. Nielsen’s writing is featured in places such as Huffington Post, Tech & Learning, MindShift, Leading & Learning. She is the author of the book Teaching Generation Text TeachingGenerationText.com, and has published. The Teenager’s Guide to Opting Out of School For Success, The Working Home Educator’s Guide to Success, and Fix The School, Not The Child.

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309 comments
My input
My input

I am a public school teacher. I believe home-school can be good for some students IF it's done right. However, PLEASE do not do so based upon this author's talking points; She makes for an absolutely horrible argument. By the way, I was home-schooled one year. Mom loved it, I didn't.

Disturbed Mother
Disturbed Mother

Good day,


I am from South Africa, sandton area, and I would like to say that I have both my children whom are teenagers home schooled, my daughter failed grade 10 as she was being bullied by 2 teachers, I took this up with the Principal but was a losing battle as he took the teachers part, my daughter is much happier and producing amazing results, the teachers bullied her and she went into a terrible depression and was afraid to go to school, both the Accounting teacher and life science teacher, my daughter didn't want me going to the school as she was afraid of being victimised by the teachers, when I reported this to the principal he didn't do much he just called in the class kids who were afraid to say anything, both F sheik and Perumal caused a huge impact on my daugher's self esteem and I have to consider taking her for treatment. However the home schooling was a wonderful option.

Thank you to the person that invented the home schooling.

Sharon
Sharon

Hello from the other side.... I am the Mom of two homeschooled teens and can confirm all 12 of those reasons but add another - Homeschooling can better prepare your children for higher education!  Homeschooling does not mean fluttering around though until they were 11 or 12 if my kids were asked what they do all day they would say "play" because learning was fun and  playing was learning and reading was fun and math was interesting - not worksheets but figuring out what they could buy at the dollar store with $5.  Very long story and I now have 1 who never completed high school but who has been accepted at University on the strength of 7 grade 12 (year 4) academic courses she completed with an A plus average while my younger teen attends a progressive high school and also gets top marks - though more importantly she still enjoys learning despite all the time she sees as wasted at school. 

These girls did not success despite HSing but because of it.  My eldest was a late reader - did not go past a grade 1 reading level until she was 11 - imagine how that would have gone over in a world of standardized testing.   Friends with schooled kids with similar processing speed and learning style all had their kids streamed into remedial work and all of their kids have struggled and hate school.   As a homeschooler we were able to let her learn to read at her own pace and read to her all the time to encourage a love of books.  We avoided English classes that were no more than  tests of how fast you could read - could you pull facts from a book faster than the other kid?  We encouraged her to write about things that mattered to her, including Facebook posts and texting her friends.   She took 2 highschool english classes online but did not worry about marks  - just learning how to do essays and tests.  The end result was a slow gradual improvement that ultimately led to full comprehension, reading skills above grade level and a 90 percent mark in her year 4 English class. 

Yes homeschooling requires committed parents and the biggest challenge is living on one income but rest assured that you do not do it alone - there will be a community of other homeschoolers you can link up with for group learning and parent support and a wealth of resources on the internet.  You don't have to know it all -  because you can learn right along side your child. 

If my daughter had gone to school she would have had long frustrating days and then I would have to coach her through hours of homework every night and our relationship would be full of stress. If that is what your life is like with your kids then you might want to give HSing a try.

Chemtutor
Chemtutor

Thank you. It is nice to see someone inpublic education aknowledge and appreciate the benefits of homeschooling. No method of education is perfect, but I'm thankful to have the opportunity to do right by my children by providing a loving, caring and  nurturing environment of our humble homeschool.

BelleMiller
BelleMiller

I'm sure homeschooling has many positive aspects, but home schooling based on what a child or parent "feels" is best is an appalling and poor argument. The first problem is that you don't feel thoughts. The second problem is some parents are uneducated, uninformed, hateful, mentally ill, or completely ignorant about what children need. Third, children are just that - children! I would love if kids were active participants in choosing what they learn, but they don't know enough about the world to plan curriculum. This is a ridiculous article full of fluff.

Deb
Deb

@BelleMiller

If you hate homeschooling then don't do it, no need to put others down for their beliefs.  For someone who doesn't want "hateful" parents teaching their children you sure have a hateful streak in you. You are also very uninformed with the homeschooling movement and those in it.  

The only possible incorrect point is standardized tests.  Most states require yearly standardized testing for homeschoolers.  These are the ones that P.S. kids are taking in certain grades.  

PaulHelm
PaulHelm

@BelleMiller sadly many schools have become a part-time jail where communists have taken over and erased most of the value schhool once had ! My guess you cannot even tell me WHO started the public schools or WHY these schools were established without doing research because both facts are omitted from curriculum in these government re-education buildings.

LM
LM

Lol, I cant help but laugh at your comment. Your comment is the only thing that's ridiculous and this article is actually very accurate, not "full of fluff" as you stated. What the article was trying to convey (that you clearly missed as you have no real knowledge of homeschooling) is that it's interest led learning - as in, you work on your children's interests and incorporate or allow that to dictate what and how you teach them, but it doesn't mean that they plan their own curriculum, lol. I'm cracking up at this completely ignorant and ridiculous thought. Children still learn to read and write, and all tjat jazz, whike focusing on a topic that they enjoy. Aren't we all more apt to learning when learning about something we find interesting or personally appealing? Homeschooling is about doing what feels best for you and your child based upon your lifestyle and your child's abilities. That wasn't a black and white statement. Your comment expressing that doing so is " appalling" is the only thing I find appalling in relation to this article. It means that you are free to work at your child's pace, whether it be faster for some things and slower for others that may take them longer to grasp. That's sometimes what it takes to truly learn something - practice and time. Just because children in school have lessons on a topic for 4 days and then a test on day 5 before moving on doesn't mean that it's the best or only way to do it, nor does it mean that every child may grasp the concept in such a short period of time. We all learn differently, different methods, different paces. Homeschooling provides one on one teaching based on a child's individual needs. Before you comment on an article about something you know nothing about, why don't you take some time to consider that maybe you should do a little research to be sure you understand what's being said about the subject so that your blatant ignorance on the matter doesn't cause you to jump to ridiculous conclusions and share those conclusions with others who know far better than you.

LM
LM

Not all states require children to take these tests. Not even all children in school have to take them anymorw, either. Tnere is an opt out option.

JRK6270
JRK6270

I agree with Deb when letting BelleMiller know that her narrow-minded, negative comments show only what she does not know about homechooling. It is okay to not like something, but it is hateful, uninformed, uneducated, and appalling to speak about this article like she has. I have homeschooled my 8 year old for 3 years (after 3 years in school) and while uninformed and scared to death to embark upon this unknown approach to education, I decided to spend SIX months educating myself with interviewing homeschooled families, visiting co-ops, reading, reading, reading.... And what I found was a community of hard working, loving, supportive, creative, and damn smart people who were devoted to their children's overall development, including a good sense of integrity, ethics, care for others, and respect for all who learn in whatever ways it keeps THE LOVE OF LEARNING ALIVE! My son LOVES to learn, his schooled peers are already complaining daily.... I am given a up close and personal view of what his peers are learning, what their days look like and so on which only reinforces my decision to HS. All the best to all the HSers out there!! Keep up the good work and keep up the love and devotion to your children!!

BelleMiller
BelleMiller

@LM Well you kind of made my point. If the article was trying to convey something about home schooling, and the only way you could pick up on that insight is if you already know a bunch about homeschooling, then the article didn't really do its job, did it? That seems to imply it's not very well written. Glad you were so tickled by my comment though. 

BelleMiller
BelleMiller

@Deb If you go back and re-read my comment with a less defensive state-of-mind you may see that I don't put down homeschooling. I actually state "I'm sure homeschooling has many positive aspects," as the opener to the whole thing.  I don't say I'm upset at others for homeschooling or say that no one should be allowed to home school. I put down this article. None of my comment is hateful and I don't see how anything I said is evidence of a hateful streak in me. The writer of this article did a poor job and is a poor reflection of what homeschooling has to offer. 

BelleMiller
BelleMiller

@PaulHelm I'm sure there are plenty of schools that have become a type of jail or daycare center instead of a place for children to learn and become successful. My original comment doesn't counter anything you're saying and I don't know where your comments are coming from honestly. This article is poorly written regardless of if homeschooling is great or horrible. 

BelleMiller
BelleMiller

@JRK6270 You're awfully defensive for someone I don't know and didn't say anything about. I don't think sharing my opinion, which differs from the writer's, equals being hateful about anything. To be clear, I wasn't accusing ALL parents who homeschool of being uneducated, uninformed, hateful, or mentally ill - but just as there are people with those qualities in every other aspect of life, there are parents with those qualities who have decided to home school and it can be problematic for their children. If your son is getting what he needs, that's great for him and for you. That doesn't change my opinion that the article is poorly written junk and that it isn't helpful to imply that any parent can home school, because some parents cannot and/or should not do so. "Don't just read about doing stuff. Do stuff," is supposed to be one of the top 12 compelling reasons to homeschool a child? I don't think so. An 8-year-old could have written that sentence, regardless of where they do their schooling. 

AlexisSmith
AlexisSmith

Well aren't you a ball of sunshine. You sound like the things you accuse some home school parents are being. Public school moms and teachers are those things too. Ignorant, rude, thoughtless, ill qualified, mean. They get to choose too. It's freedom. No. You don't feel thoughts however there is real science on gut instinct and parental intuition. You know. Real science. With papers and YALE and HARVARD on them. Respected ones. You know... some people open their mouths and think they have a well thought out opinion and then it turns out they don't like home schoolers because "not all of them are perfect or right". Well by that metric? I would suggest avoiding doctors and criticising them and their motives too. Some are greedy, many make errors and mistakes, some commit malpractice.

BelleMiller
BelleMiller

@AlexisSmith I didn't accuse home school patients of being anything. I said parents can be those things and it can be risky for the kids being home schooled by said parents. I didn't say anything about anyone being perfect or right. I didn't even attack homeschooling. I called out this article for being poorly written, because it is. If you can read papers from Yale and Harvard and comprehend them, I'm sure you can go back and comprehend my comment and notice that I take issue with the way the writer discusses the issue of homeschooling; I did not take issue with homeschooling in general.

Amemomo
Amemomo

That's a silly uneducated opinion about homeschooling. There are so many structured curriculums and ideas to work with and choose from. Many come with DVD's to teach lessons. Some are self paced, some are very detailed. The point is, you can decide as a family what works best for your children. The families those don't succeed in homeschooling probably wouldn't succeed in public school. You still have to be disciplined and complete your work. I don't understand why people who choose not to homeschool make such a big deal about it. It's really none of your business. I wish I would've homeschooled my oldest daughter. She needed the more one on one teaching style.

LM
LM

@BelleMiller The article is a great starting point on homeschooling - if it leaves you with questions or a desire to understand, which is how many people, including myself, started the homeschooling journey - full of questions and lacking any knowledge about the specifics - then it's up to you to do further research. I needed clarity on a lot when I started to become interested in homeschooling. I read many articles like this and then dug deeper for clarification.

What it comes down to is that you judged something as fluff and stated it was ridiculous, based on a narrow minded interpretation of what the author was implying. Saying that a child is encouraged to follow their passions, etc. Isn't the same things as saying they create their own curriculum - that was an assumption you made.

Like I said, this is a great starting point in learning about homeschooling. Knowing more about it wasn't the only way to pick up on what was being conveyed in all cases. It was very clearly written, and your comment only seemed intent on being negative, not searching for any additional information or attemtping to gain knowlege or answers to questions you might have had.

GinaH80
GinaH80

@BelleMiller  I am a homeschooling mom to my 4 young kids, but I do agree with you that children are just children and shouldn't be choosing their curriculum.  I have some friends that are "unschoolers" and let their kids do whatever...I choose what my kids do, because if it was up to them they would watch movies and play games all day :D I enjoy homeschooling, but I am not against schools like some homeschoolers. 

saige oikmen
saige oikmen

 I read your post and it is so inspirational i just have one question that i hope that you can answer, you see i don't like my new school so im trying to convince my parents to homeschooling me but how do i do it i don't want to copy paste your post in my brain and witch time would it be to ask them and one last question where you homeschooling if yes how did you convinced your parents to home-school you?? i hope you can answer me as soon as possible because im planing to start being home schooled in Christmas break please answer me im practically desperate.....


love 

-Saige

RichardBale
RichardBale

CAN ANYONE ANSWER THIS QUESTION? WHY TEACH?

smarie
smarie

Not saying that home schooling is not effective, but these 12 "compelling" reasons are not compelling at all! Just to point out a few, #3 - some would argue that it is the use of tech such as cell phones that leads to more and more children less interested in reading. #4 - a little confused as to how children are able to socialize more and make global connections from home. #5 - the use of "bubble tests" are essential for the preparation of college, graduate education or beyond (ie. SAT, GRE, MCAT, USMLE are all examples of standardized "bubble tests"). #6 - "At home children don't need to spend their time reading and writing about what other people do. They can do stuff.", now I'm sorry, but this just sounds like a very uneducated comment. We read and write about what other people before us have done in order to learn from other's mistakes before jumping into an activity. No sense in reinventing the wheel. You read and write first, and then you do! #9 - "Do work you value". Children need to learn how to do the work given and take on responsibilities. It is what is eventually needed to maintain a job...unless you KNOW 100% you are raising an entrepreneur, but even then, to get through college, you go by the accredited college's curriculum, NOT one that YOU feel is important. #11 - As mentioned before college education and beyond use standardized testing. Your physicians and lawyers credibility is measured

smarie
smarie

...by their performance on standardized testing. Standardized testing is not a form of learning, it is a form of measuring level of education and therefore a necessary assessment of qualification. Therefore, it is hardly a waste of time. I can go on and on about each one of these reasons. As mentioned, I am not saying home schooling is not effective, but this article is pretty ineffective in convincing me why I should home school my child.

SFireSmith
SFireSmith

@smarie Unfortunately, those who are unfamiliar with home education think that our students just sit at home all day.  My kids are part of a home school group of 80+ students that range from 5-17.  Our kids do one group field trip a month and one art day a month.  Regularly, we break off into smaller groups for age, gender or interest specific functions and events.  Thirty two of our children just wrote, rehearsed for 5 months and then performed a musical play at a local Middle School which the parents rented for the day.  We had 500+ guests to watch the performance.  Many of us participate in Physical Education weekly at a local park where our city operates a "home school phys ed class" to teach team sports to our kids - and we pay for it.  They socialize with those whom they choose; and those who have similar values and aspirations.  Home education is not about sitting at a desk all day.  It's about taking charge of your life and your future.  Incidentally, most of the parents in the group own their own businesses which they run from their homes or small offices; and have no student loans to pay off.  They often learned a skill or trade and then worked towards self employment.  They're teaching their kids to value "a simplified life" instead of aiming for wealth and prestige.  We aim to give our kids a well rounded, functional and inspiring education; with minimal wasted time.  We also truly enjoy being with our kids and realize kids don't stay home forever.  We cherish this time with them.  However, home education is not for everyone.  It takes dedication to your kids education, self discipline and balance.  Not everyone can do it.  

JennyM3070
JennyM3070

@smarie I think what was meant by that was that a lot of schools teach to the test.  I have 2 kids who went through the public schools. I also have my youngest who is homeschooled.  My son's school's all taught to the test.  Many of them complained that they had to.  That it wasn't helping the kids learn all they should since time was spent on learning the test to take the test.  They are not true evaluations of a child's knowledge.   In my state I don't have to test my daughter.  I know that she is learning and what she is learning.  No need to spend many hours preparing for and taking a standardized test.  


to me it sounds like you have no idea what homeschooling is.  


In my school settings kids are more socialized in the homeschool community then they are in schools.  My friends daughter's school wont even allow the kids to talk at lunch.  His daughter just got detention because she tried talking to her friend about a class they both were in.  How are they socialized?


LM
LM

You and Belle Miller totally missed the points here bc you don't know anything about homeschooling. Y'all both took it literally for face value bc you don't understand what is actually being said.

JRK6270
JRK6270

Smarie - #4 - in one of our homeschool co-ops we have families from Holland, China, Australia, France.... Just to name a few. Religions include Christian, Jewish, Atheist, Agnostic, Muslim... Just to name a few... We have age ranges of infant to 18 to have access to developing friendships with many different people... We have people from a 30 miles radius so have opportunities to travel to different areas within our region to say, spend days on a farm, or in an inner city row house, or any other configuration of home as it is defined..... Just to name a few.... We have the TIME, the ability and the OKAY to TALK all day, to LEARN freely from people of different backgrounds.... There is no "be quiet", "raise your hand", "no talking now", "listen to me, the teacher, standing at the head of the class, who knows more than you and plans to tell you that".... No.... Our kids LIVE and LEARN, with our guidance, support, encouragement, coaching.... #5 - many colleges and universities are using alternative methods to determine readiness and fit for their establishments, including totally eradicating standardized tests, seeking portfolios, and admitting (happily) that homeschooled young adults are more often better prepared to enter college than their counterparts who were spoon fed knowledge, much of which they will not use as adults. #6 - completely false that you need to read BEFORE doing. I personally know and interact regularly with BRILLIANT tweets/teens who did not read until 8-10 years of age. They KNEW a lot prior to grasping the written word. Did our ancestors READ and WRITE? NO, they were orators, yet they were brilliant and passed invaluable information on to the successive generations....#9 - most adults I know do not like their jobs, do not even know how they ended up in the field they are in.... Very sad.... To have the TIME and encouragement to find your passions AND actually DO them will result in more people pursuing them, making them a reality and more overall happiness.... My current PCP was HOMESCHOOLED his entire life! I have several families in my homeschool circle whose children are pursuing higher Ed degrees including law, medical degrees etc. - all with a HOMESCHOOLED education. It is more than possible, it is happening... Before your eyes... And it's AWESOME!!!

SS in the
SS in the

couple more.  1) the "adults know best and the kids are there to be trained" model is inherently violent.  2) for some kids, being part of a group is so difficult that there is little energy left over for learning 3) where we live, it was hard to be the only non Christian kids had ever met.  someone we know got  told they were going to hell on a daily basis, even by the concerned teachers. 4) someone who is asynchronous in development is not always well served

KellyBeaulieuGraves
KellyBeaulieuGraves

I just wanted to say my son goes to school but I like some of the homeschooling ideas but when I read some of the comments about school now a days....give me a break, my sons school is amazing the teacher's are great and caring, no knives no guns but I feel you do have to stay in touch with their teachers. My son has made many friends and yes they are around the neighborhood but now we know more kids to play with. I think if people want to homeschool go for it and for the rest of us we send our kids to school for a lot of different reasons and that's why we are a FREE country..

Bonnie
Bonnie

My daughters elementary teachers and principal were straight out of hell and enjoyed attacking my family making my already sixk anxious child more anxious. We were forced to homeschool after years of retaliation from sociopaths. I don't think you are looking hard enough for the schools and teachers ftom hell. Eventually she got better and decided to try a sane middle school with a sane principal and teachers who care. Believe me there are BAD schoold

RichardBale
RichardBale

I could give you some more reasons too. Instead of generisism of Darwinism of perhaps, probably, supposedly or maybe millions of years ago, man came from monkeys when monkeys grow fur and an extra knuckle to walk on the back of their hands. Man grows hair which is much different than fur and man can think of what is right and wrong and reason within himself as a monkey cannot put to words and will do nothing more than shinnannigans and pull tricks and pranks on each other and eat each other and have no morals about them. By the way, monkey's brains are much smaller than the human brain.

    By the way, some children with a wrong preconceived ideas of immorality and unGodly words, actions, and intentions seems to go against the norm of civility that certainly do not have the teachings of a church whatsoever, with more of the TV indiscretionary viewing that is not cared about or is not supervised at home of which gets acted out and repeated by those who like to see their neighbors be hurt by and make a career out of anything violent and unedifying and made to feel  very conscienciously unholy and uncomfortable to the other person with more proper bringing up opposite of being dragged up from the jungle!!!

Rev. Richard M. Bale



LaurenKempel
LaurenKempel

@RichardBale We didn't evolve from monkeys. You need to open book written by someone qualified to educate you. Start with astrophysicists and move on to (millions of years later) Darwin's Theories (try actually reading the books).

RichardBale
RichardBale

@LaurenKempel @RichardBale I know we didn't evolve. I have read and still do read God's Word KJB and I have books from ICR-Institute of Creation Research and Bible Commentaries. I have more books than you can shake a stick at!!! LOL


ScrapCath
ScrapCath

@RichardBale @LaurenKempel  

Yep, we know your kind like to shake sticks and worse Richard. I suggest you open your mind and actually interact with homeschooled children. You will find them in your church community for sure. You just don't know it!

I am yet to meet an home schooled child who knows which tv shows you are talking about!

RichardBale
RichardBale

@ScrapCath @RichardBale @LaurenKempel You understood me wrong ScrapCath. I have socialized with homeschooled children and it wasn't them of whom I was referring.  I would rather you refer to your tv guide and see the listings for yourself. And for keeping an opened mind, mine is closed for satan's use; thank you very much ScrapCath.

Nancy
Nancy

@RichardBale Wow. Atrocious grammar, incorrect spelling, and a second paragraph that is only one sentence. Something went missing in your education, other than the obvious (that you are wrong about creationism). A child (or an adult) doesn't need to believe in your god to be a moral, just, intelligent person.



Tejohn
Tejohn

I disagree about current schools being "Industrial". Dewey started that. The rest of the article is right on target.

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